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Author Notes:

Corresponding author at: Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 1441 Clifton Road Northeast, R228, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. michael.borich@emory.edu (M.R. Borich).

Subject:

Research Funding:

This study was funded by a grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research [to L.A.B.].

The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada provided support for this work to M.R.B.

B.L. is supported by postdoctoral fellowships from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.

The Canada Research Chairs and the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research provided salary support to L.A.B.

L.A.W is supported by the National Science Foundation.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Stroke
  • TMS
  • EEG
  • TMS-EEG
  • Connectivity
  • Coherence
  • GABA
  • Beta
  • Rehabilitation
  • Motor cortex
  • TASK-DEPENDENT MODULATION
  • FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY
  • MOTOR FUNCTION
  • MOVEMENT
  • OSCILLATIONS
  • SYNCHRONIZATION
  • ACTIVATION
  • CORTEX
  • REHABILITATION
  • REORGANIZATION

Evaluating interhemispheric cortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in chronic stroke: A TMS-EEG investigation

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neuroscience Letters

Volume:

Volume 618

Publisher:

, Pages 25-30

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

TMS-evoked cortical responses can be measured using simultaneous electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to directly quantify cortical connectivity in the human brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interhemispheric cortical connectivity between the primary motor cortices (M1s) in participants with chronic stroke and controls using TMS-EEG. Ten participants with chronic stroke and four controls were tested. TMS-evoked responses were recorded at rest and during a typical TMS assessment of transcallosal inhibition (TCI). EEG recordings from peri-central gyral electrodes (C3 and C4) were evaluated using imaginary phase coherence (IPC) analyses to quantify levels of effective interhemispheric connectivity. Significantly increased TMS-evoked beta (15-30 Hz frequency range) IPC was observed in the stroke group during ipsilesional M1 stimulation compared to controls during TCI assessment but not at rest. TMS-evoked beta IPC values were associated with TMS measures of transcallosal inhibition across groups. These results suggest TMS-evoked EEG responses can index abnormal effective interhemispheric connectivity in chronic stroke.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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