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Author Notes:

Correspondence: Email: eberhard.voit@bme.gatech.edu

Parts of this article were presented at the Guldberg-Waage Days, March 10–11, 2014, at the Norwegian Academy of Science at Drammensveien, Oslo, Norway.

However, none of this material has been published in proceedings, journal articles, or online.

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The authors received no specific funding for this work.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Biochemical Research Methods
  • Mathematical & Computational Biology
  • Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMS-ANALYSIS
  • TIME-SERIES DATA
  • REACTION-KINETICS
  • S-SYSTEMS
  • MODELS
  • APPROXIMATION
  • EQUILIBRIA
  • SIMULATION
  • EPIDEMICS

150 Years of the Mass Action Law

Tools:

Journal Title:

PLoS Computational Biology

Volume:

Volume 11, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages e1004012-e1004012

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

This year we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the law of mass action. This law is often assumed to have been “there” forever, but it has its own history, background, and a definite starting point. The law has had an impact on chemistry, biochemistry, biomathematics, and systems biology that is difficult to overestimate. It is easily recognized that it is the direct basis for computational enzyme kinetics, ecological systems models, and models for the spread of diseases. The article reviews the explicit and implicit role of the law of mass action in systems biology and reveals how the original, more general formulation of the law emerged one hundred years later ab initio as a very general, canonical representation of biological processes.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Voit et al

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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