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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Laura Schreibman University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA e-mail: lschreibman@ucsd.edu

The preparation of this manuscript was supported by the Autism Speaks Toddler Treatment Network.

The authors wish to express appreciation for the helpful contributions of Lauren Elder and Drs. Rosy M. Freeden and Mendy Boettcher Minjarez.

We would also like to thank the many families with whom we have had the privilege to work and our mentors, in hopes that we may use what they taught us to build a more integrated and efficacious science of autism treatment.

Subject:

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology, Developmental
  • Psychology
  • Early intervention
  • Naturalistic
  • Developmental
  • Behavioral
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • JOINT ATTENTION
  • YOUNG-CHILDREN
  • LANGUAGE-DEVELOPMENT
  • COMMUNICATION INTERVENTIONS
  • STIMULUS OVERSELECTIVITY
  • PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN
  • SOCIAL INITIATIONS
  • TRAINING PARENTS
  • SYMBOLIC PLAY

Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions: Empirically Validated Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Journal Title:

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Volume:

Volume 45, Number 8

Publisher:

, Pages 2411-2428

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Earlier autism diagnosis, the importance of early intervention, and development of specific interventions for young children have contributed to the emergence of similar, empirically supported, autism interventions that represent the merging of applied behavioral and developmental sciences. “Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions (NDBI)” are implemented in natural settings, involve shared control between child and therapist, utilize natural contingencies, and use a variety of behavioral strategies to teach developmentally appropriate and prerequisite skills. We describe the development of NDBIs, their theoretical bases, empirical support, requisite characteristics, common features, and suggest future research needs. We wish to bring parsimony to a field that includes interventions with different names but common features thus improving understanding and choice-making among families, service providers and referring agencies.

Copyright information:

© 2015, The Author(s).

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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