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Author Notes:

Correspondence: lcklein@psu.edu

Sunmi Song analyzed the data, wrote the paper, prepared figures and/or tables, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Jennifer E. Graham-Engeland contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Elizabeth J. Corwin and Laura Cousino Klein conceived and designed the experiments, performed the experiments, contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Rachel M. Ceballos conceived and designed the experiments, performed the experiments, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Shelley E. Taylor conceived and designed the experiments, contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools, reviewed drafts of the paper.

Teresa Seeman conceived and designed the experiments, reviewed drafts of the paper.

We appreciate the dedicated assistance of undergraduate students in the Biobehavioral Health Studies Lab, the GCRC nursing staff, MM Stine and CA Whetzel.

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

The following information was supplied relating to ethical approvals (i.e., approving body and any reference numbers): The Pennsylvania State University Institutional Review Board: IRB # 00M0314-B9.

The authors declare there are no competing interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Funding was provided by the General Clinical Research Center of The Pennsylvania State University (NIH grant MO1-RR-10732).

Funding was also provided by the National Science Foundataion (SBR9905157; SET and LCK) and a grant from the College of Health and Human Development of The Pennsylvania State University (223-15-3605; LCK and EJC).

The first author is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Social and Behavioral Research Branch at the National Human Genome Research Institute and was supported by a Kligman Graduate Fellowship via the College of Health and Human Development at The Pennsylvania State University (S Song).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • Stress
  • Multiple negative social relationships
  • Hostility
  • Inflammatory cytokine response
  • Depressed mood
  • A Trier Social Stress Task
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • HOSTILITY
  • HEALTH
  • INTERLEUKIN-6
  • WOMEN
  • MEN
  • AGE

The role of multiple negative social relationships in inflammatory cytokine responses to a laboratory stressor

Tools:

Journal Title:

PeerJ

Volume:

Volume 3

Publisher:

, Pages e959-e959

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

The present study examined the unique impact of perceived negativity in multiple social relationships on endocrine and inflammatory responses to a laboratory stressor. Via hierarchical cluster analysis, those who reported negative social exchanges across relationships with a romantic partner, family, and their closest friend had higher mean IL-6 across time and a greater increase in TNF-α from 15 min to 75 min post stress. Those who reported negative social exchanges across relationships with roommates, family, and their closest friend showed greater IL-6 responses to stress. Differences in mean IL-6 were accounted for by either depressed mood or hostility, whereas differences in the cytokine stress responses remained significant after controlling for those factors. Overall, this research provides preliminary evidence to suggest that having multiple negative relationships may exacerbate acute inflammatory responses to a laboratory stressor independent of hostility and depressed mood.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Song et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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