About this item:

333 Views | 256 Downloads

Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Melanie H. Jacobson, MPH, 1518 Clifton Road NE, CNR 3rd Floor, Atlanta, GA 30322, Tel: 404-727-8499; fax: 404-727-8737, Email: mhymanjacobson@emory.edu

The authors wish to thank Amy Fothergill for all data inquires and support.

The Furthering Understanding of Cancer, Health, and Survivorship in Adult (FUCHSIA) Women Study

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Funding for this research was provided by The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant 1R01HD066059.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Reproductive Biology
  • Amenorrhea
  • menstrual function
  • cancer treatment
  • cancer survivorship
  • EARLY BREAST-CANCER
  • CHEMOTHERAPY-RELATED AMENORRHEA
  • MENSTRUAL-CYCLE PATTERNS
  • DISEASE-FREE SURVIVAL
  • OVARIAN FAILURE
  • ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY
  • REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS
  • PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN
  • DIABETES-MELLITUS
  • PROGNOSTIC IMPACT

Menses resumption after cancer treatment-induced amenorrhea occurs early or not at all

Journal Title:

Fertility and Sterility

Volume:

Volume 105, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 765-772

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objective To identify factors associated with cancer treatment-induced amenorrhea and time to return of menses. Design Population-based cohort study Setting Georgia Patients Female cancer survivors who were diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 20–35 and were at least 2 years post-diagnosis at the time of recruitment (median=7 years, interquartile range= 5–11). Intervention(s) None Main Outcome Measure(s) Amenorrhea (≥ 6 months without menses) and resumption of menses. Results After excluding women with hysterectomies prior to cancer diagnosis, 1,043 women were eligible for analysis. Amenorrhea occurred in 31.6% of women. Among women treated with chemotherapy (n=596), older age at diagnosis (30–35 versus 20–24 years: adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.37, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30, 4.30) and nulligravidity (versus gravid: aOR=1.50, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.21) were risk factors for amenorrhea. Among amenorrheic women, menses resumed in most (70.0%), and resumption occurred within 2 years of treatment for 90.0% of women. Survivors of breast cancer were more likely resume menses at times greater than one year compared with lymphoma and pelvic-area cancers. Women diagnosed at older ages, those exposed to chemotherapy, and those exposed to any radiation experienced longer times to return of menses. Women who were older at diagnosis were more likely to have irregular cycles when menses returned. Conclusion Treatment-induced amenorrhea is common in cancer survivors although most women resume menses within 2 years. However, once resumed, older women are more likely to have irregular cycles. Age at diagnosis and pregnancy history affect the risk of amenorrhea.

Copyright information:

© 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote