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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Sabriya L. Linton, PhD, MPH, Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Office 552, Atlanta, GA 30322, Office number: (404) 727-8295, Email: sabriya.linton@emory.edu

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Substance Abuse
  • Psychiatry
  • Substance use
  • Social networks
  • Neighborhood characteristics
  • Social epidemiology
  • Longitudinal analysis
  • US
  • INJECTION-DRUG-USERS
  • PUBLIC-HOUSING RELOCATIONS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • SUBSTANCE USE
  • COLLECTIVE EFFICACY
  • RACIAL DISPARITIES
  • EARLY ADOLESCENCE
  • VIOLENT CRIME
  • COCAINE USE
  • ALCOHOL-USE

People and places: Relocating to neighborhoods with better economic and social conditions is associated with less risky drug/alcohol network characteristics among African American adults in Atlanta, GA

Tools:

Journal Title:

Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Volume:

Volume 160

Publisher:

, Pages 30-41

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background Few studies assess whether place characteristics are associated with social network characteristics that create vulnerability to substance use. Methods This longitudinal study analyzed 7 waves of data (2009-2014) from a predominantly substance-using cohort of 172 African-American adults relocated from public housing complexes in Atlanta, GA, to determine whether post-relocation changes in exposure to neighborhood conditions were associated with four network characteristics related to substance use: number of social network members who used illicit drugs or alcohol in excess in the past six months (“drug/alcohol network”), drug/alcohol network stability, and turnover into and out of drug/alcohol networks. Individual-and network-level characteristics were captured via survey and administrative data were used to describe census tracts where participants lived. Multilevel models were used to assess relationships of census tract-level characteristics to network outcomes over time. Results On average, participants relocated to census tracts that had less economic disadvantage, social disorder, and renter-occupied housing. Post-relocation reductions in exposure to economic disadvantage were associated with fewer drug/alcohol network members and less turnover into drug/alcohol networks. Post-relocation improvements in exposure to multiple census tract-level social conditions were associated with fewer drug/alcohol network members, less turnover into drug/alcohol networks, less drug/alcohol network stability, and more turnover out of drug/alcohol networks. Conclusion Relocating to neighborhoods with less economic disadvantage and better social conditions may weaken relationships with substance-using individuals.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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