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Author Notes:

Address correspondence to Laura Suggs, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 107 W. Dean Keeton, BME Building, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, TX 78712, USA and Stanislav Emelianov, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University School of Medicine, 313 Ferst Dr NW, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA. Email: suggs@mail.utexas.edu and; Email: emelian@mail.utexas.edu

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Technology
  • Engineering, Biomedical
  • Engineering
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Imaging contrast agents
  • Therapeutic agents
  • Multimodal tracking
  • In vivo imaging
  • In vivo tracking
  • Stem cells
  • Scaffold engineering
  • Real-time imaging
  • MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS
  • IRON-OXIDE NANOPARTICLES
  • MESOPOROUS SILICA NANOPARTICLES
  • WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES
  • ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS
  • COATED GOLD NANOPARTICLES
  • ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE
  • IN-VIVO TRANSFECTION
  • LONG-TERM FATE
  • DRUG-DELIVERY

Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents for Enhancing Tissue Engineering Characterization and Therapies

Tools:

Journal Title:

Annals of Biomedical Engineering

Volume:

Volume 44, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 750-772

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The past three decades have seen numerous advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) therapies. However, despite the successes there is still much to be done before TERM therapies become commonplace in clinic. One of the main obstacles is the lack of knowledge regarding complex tissue engineering processes. Imaging strategies, in conjunction with exogenous contrast agents, can aid in this endeavor by assessing in vivo therapeutic progress. The ability to uncover real-time treatment progress will help shed light on the complex tissue engineering processes and lead to development of improved, adaptive treatments. More importantly, the utilized exogenous contrast agents can double as therapeutic agents. Proper use of these Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents (MIRAs) can help increase TERM therapy successes and allow for clinical translation. While other fields have exploited similar particles for combining diagnostics and therapy, MIRA research is still in its beginning stages with much of the current research being focused on imaging or therapeutic applications, separately. Advancing MIRA research will have numerous impacts on achieving clinical translations of TERM therapies. Therefore, it is our goal to highlight current MIRA progress and suggest future research that can lead to effective TERM treatments.

Copyright information:

© 2015, Biomedical Engineering Society.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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