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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Yair Feld. yairfeld@gmail.com.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NS045962, NS073994, NCRR RR000165 and ORIP/OD OD011132), Forum Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and GeneGraft, Ltd.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • globus pallidum
  • autologous
  • levodopa
  • antiparkinsonian
  • monkeys
  • DEEP BRAIN-STIMULATION
  • BASAL GANGLIA
  • SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS
  • NEURONAL-ACTIVITY
  • GLOBUS-PALLIDUS
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • L-DOPA
  • DISEASE
  • PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
  • PALLIDOTOMY

Effects of fibroblast transplantation into the internal pallidum on levodopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian non-human primates

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neuroscience Bulletin

Volume:

Volume 31, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 705-713

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Recent studies have shown that fibroblast transplantation can modify the activity of basal ganglia networks in models of Parkinson’s disease. To determine its effects on parkinsonian motor symptoms, we performed autologous dermal fibroblast transplantation into the internal pallidum (GPi) in two parkinsonian rhesus monkeys with stable levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs). Levodopa responses were assessed every week after transplantation for three months. A reduction of between 58% and 64% in total LIDs on the contralateral side was observed in both animals. No clear LID changes were observed on the ipsilateral side. These effects lasted the entire 3-month period in one monkey, but declined after 6–8 weeks in the other. The antiparkinsonian effects of levodopa did not diminish. The results of this pilot study indicate that fibroblast transplantation into the GPi may have beneficial effects on LIDs and warrant further investigation for potential therapeutic use.

Copyright information:

© 2015, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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