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Author Notes:

#Corresponding author: Chandrabali Ghose, Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, New York, New York, 455 First Avenue, 7th Floor, New York, New York 10016, Phone: 1-212-448-5094, Fax: 1-212-725-1126, Email: cghose@adarc.org

We thank Wendy Chen for help with figure production and Craig Hunter for help with animal work.

Subject:

Research Funding:

This research was supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health through research grants R01AI095256-01A1 (D.D.H and CP.K.), DK087763, DK101870 and AI109526 to S.M.M. and NIDDK grant K01DK092352 (X.S.).

Support for this project was also provided by a grant from the Robertson Foundation.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Microbiology
  • Clostridium difficile
  • Spores
  • Exosporium
  • CdeM
  • CdeC
  • BclA1
  • CotA
  • Vaccine
  • LINKED-IMMUNOSORBENT-ASSAY
  • TOXIN-A
  • CONJUGATIVE TRANSPOSON
  • INFECTION
  • ANTIBODIES
  • VACCINE
  • GENOME
  • COLONIZATION
  • RESPONSES
  • HAMSTERS

Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Clostridium difficile spore proteins

Tools:

Journal Title:

Anaerobe

Volume:

Volume 37

Publisher:

, Pages 85-95

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, anaerobic, Gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea, commonly known as C. difficile infection (CDI). C. difficile spores play an important role in the pathogenesis of CDI. Spore proteins, especially those that are surface-bound may play an essential role in the germination, colonization and persistence of C. difficile in the human gut. In our current study, we report the identification of two surface-bound spore proteins, CdeC and CdeM that may be utilized as immunization candidates against C. difficile. These spore proteins are immunogenic in mice and are able to protect mice against challenge with C. difficile UK1, a clinically-relevant 027/B1/NAP1 strain. These spore proteins are also able to afford high levels of protection against challenge with C. difficile 630δerm in golden Syrian hamsters. This unprecedented study shows the vaccination potential of C. difficile spore exosporium proteins.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

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