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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Ravi Mangal Patel, MD, MSc. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Dr. NE, Division of Neonatology, Atlanta, GA 30322. Telephone: 404-727-5905; Fax: 404-727-3236; Email: rmpatel@emory.edu

The author would like to acknowledge Ira Adams-Chapman M.D., M.P.H. for her thoughtful review of the manuscript.

There are no relevant conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This review was supported, in part, by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers KL2TR000455 and UL1TR000454.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Pediatrics
  • prematurity
  • low birth weight
  • neurodevelopment
  • survival
  • morbidity
  • periviable
  • LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT
  • PATENT DUCTUS-ARTERIOSUS
  • HYALINE-MEMBRANE DISEASE
  • EMPIRICAL ANTIBIOTIC-TREATMENT
  • EXTREMELY PREMATURE-INFANTS
  • NEONATAL RESEARCH NETWORK
  • ACTIVE PERINATAL-CARE
  • CHRONIC LUNG-DISEASE
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • AGE 5 YEARS

Short- and Long-Term Outcomes for Extremely Preterm Infants

Tools:

Journal Title:

American Journal of Perinatology Reports

Volume:

Volume 33, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 318-327

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Prematurity is the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. In developed countries, extremely preterm infants contribute disproportionately to both neonatal and infant mortality. Survival of this high-risk population has incrementally improved in recent years. Despite these improvements, approximately one in four extremely preterm infants dies during the birth hospitalization. Among those who survive, respiratory and other morbidities are common, although their effect on quality of life is variable. In addition, long-term neurodevelopmental impairment is a large concern for patients, clinicians, and families. However, the interplay of multiple factors contributes to neurodevelopmental impairment, with measures that change over time and outcomes that can be difficult to define and predict. Understanding outcomes of extremely preterm infants can help better counsel families regarding antenatal and postnatal care and guide strategies to improve survival without morbidity. This review summarizes recent evidence to provide an overview into the short- and long-term outcomes for extremely preterm infants.

Copyright information:

© 2016 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.

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