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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Anne M. Fitzpatrick, PhD, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, 2015 Uppergate Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322.

Please address correspondence to: Anne M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., 2015 Uppergate Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322, Email: anne.fitzpatrick@emory.edu. Telephone: 404-727-9112; Facsimile: 404-712-0920

Conflicts of interest: A. M. Fitzpatrick has received research support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH); and has received consultancy fees from MedImmune, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Genentech.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grant no. U10HL098103.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Severe asthma
  • Children
  • Lung function
  • Phenotype
  • Endotype
  • Inflammation
  • EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE
  • GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
  • AIR-FLOW LIMITATION
  • TO-TREAT ASTHMA
  • RESEARCH-PROGRAM
  • CLUSTER-ANALYSIS
  • CHILDHOOD ASTHMA
  • NATIONAL HEART
  • TOBACCO-SMOKE
  • UNITED-STATES

Severe Asthma in Children: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Volume:

Volume 4, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 11-19

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Severe asthma in children is a complicated and heterogeneous disorder that is extremely challenging to treat. Although most children with asthma derive clinical benefit from daily administration of low-to-medium-dose inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy, a small subset of children with "severe" or "refractory" asthma require high doses of ICS and even systemic corticosteroids to maintain symptom control. These children with severe asthma are at increased risk for adverse outcomes including medication-related side effects and recurrent and life-threatening exacerbations that significantly impair quality of life. This review highlights findings on severe asthma in school-age children (age 6-17 years) from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) over a 10-year period, between 2001 and 2011. Although SARP has advanced knowledge of the unique clinical, biological, and molecular attributes of severe asthma in children, considerable gaps remain for which additional studies are needed.

Copyright information:

© 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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