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Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Kyle Steenland, PhD, Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Tel.: +1 404 712 8277; Fax: +1 404 727 8722; Email: nsteenl@emory.edu

Authors’ disclosures available online (http://j-alz.com/manuscript-disclosures/15-0778r1).

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Funding for this work came from the Emory Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (NIH-NIA 5 P50 AG025688) (AIL).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • African-American
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Caucasian
  • incidence
  • prevalence
  • race
  • MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
  • APOLIPOPROTEIN-E EPSILON-4
  • UNITED-STATES
  • DEMENTIA DIAGNOSIS
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • AGE
  • POPULATION
  • SURVIVAL
  • WHITES

A Meta-Analysis of Alzheimer's Disease Incidence and Prevalence Comparing African-Americans and Caucasians

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

Volume:

Volume 50, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 71-76

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: Several studies have shown higher Alzheimer's disease (AD) incidence rates are in African-Americans (AAs) than Caucasians (CCs). If this finding is consistent across studies, it raises important etiologic questions regarding factors responsible for this discrepancy. It also affects the likely public health burden of AD in the US in the future, as the non-Caucasian population becomes the majority. Objective: Estimate the AA/CC rate ratio for AD incidence across all available studies. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of population-based studies for the rate ratio (RR) of AD incidence for AAs versus CCs, after identifying six relevant studies from the literature.We calculated an AA/CC rate ratio across all studies using inversevariance weighting, and assessed inter-study heterogeneity. Using these incidence data, as well as data on survival after diagnosis, and on all-cause mortality, we also estimated the US prevalence of AD among AAs and CCs. Results: There were six population-based studies with data comparing AD incidence between AAs and CCs, with an estimated 370 AA and 640 CC incident cases. The meta-analysis RR showed that the AD rate for AAs was 64% higher than for CCs (RR = 1.64 (95% CI 1.35-2.00)), with no evidence of heterogeneity.We estimated the current US AD prevalence for ages 65-90 to be 5.5% for CCs, and 8.6% for AAs (prevalence ratio 1.56). Conclusion: AAs have an increased risk of incident and prevalent AD compared to CCs for reasons which are unknown, but are hypothesized to reflect biological, psychological, and socioeconomic factors.

Copyright information:

© 2016 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

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