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Author Notes:

Address correspondence and reprints to David W. Wright, Emergency Neuroscience, Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University, FOB Suite 126, 49 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE, Atlanta, GA 30303. Phone: 404­778­1709 Fax: 404­778­1604.  E­mail: david.wright@emory.edu

DWW conceived and initiated the review. ERD participated in the literature review, assisted with study interpretation, prepared the first draft and final draft. TRE, FA, EW, JK, and DWW assisted with the literature review, data interpretation, editing drafts, and contributed significantly to manuscript preparation.

We would like to thank Dr. Donald Stein and Ms. Leslie McCann for their review and editing of the manuscript.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • NEUROSCIENCES
  • Progesterone
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Neuroprotection
  • TRAUMATIC BRAIN-INJURY
  • SPINAL-CORD-INJURY
  • GLOBAL CEREBRAL-ISCHEMIA
  • EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS
  • CORTICAL CONTUSION INJURY
  • AMYGDALA-KINDLED SEIZURES
  • SEX STEROID-HORMONES
  • PROGESTIN MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE
  • DISEASE-MODIFYING ACTIVITY
  • RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL

Progesterone's role in neuroprotection, a review of the evidence

Tools:

Journal Title:

Brain Research

Volume:

Volume 1530

Publisher:

, Pages 82-105

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The sex hormone progesterone has been shown to improve outcomes in animal models of a number of neurologic diseases, including traumatic brain injury, ischemia, spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve injury, demyelinating disease, neuromuscular disorders, and seizures. Evidence suggests it exerts its neuroprotective effects through several pathways, including reducing edema, improving neuronal survival, and modulating inflammation and apoptosis. In this review, we summarize the functional outcomes and pathophysiologic mechanisms attributed to progesterone treatment in neurologic disease. We then comment on the breadth of evidence for the use of progesterone in each neurologic disease family. Finally, we provide support for further human studies using progesterone to treat several neurologic diseases.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Elsevier B.V.

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