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Author Notes:

To whom correspondence should be addressed: PAR: par1@cdc.gov. MRP: prausnitz@gatech.edu.

Please see full article for acknowledgements.

Mark Prausnitz is an inventor of patents that have been licensed to companies developing microneedle-based products, is a paid advisor to companies developing microneedle-based products, and is a founder/shareholder of companies developing microneedle-based products.

The resulting potential conflict of interest has been disclosed and is managed by Georgia Tech and Emory University.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Global Immunization Division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Immunology
  • Research & Experimental Medicine
  • Measles
  • Vaccination
  • Microneedle
  • Stability
  • Non-human primate
  • TRANSDERMAL DRUG-DELIVERY
  • RHESUS MACAQUES
  • POLYMER MICRONEEDLES
  • UNSAFE INJECTIONS
  • VIRUS-INFECTION
  • IMMUNIZATION
  • ANTIBODY
  • ERADICATION
  • INFLUENZA
  • FABRICATION

A microneedle patch containing measles vaccine is immunogenic in non-human primates

Tools:

Journal Title:

Vaccine

Volume:

Volume 33, Number 37

Publisher:

, Pages 4712-4718

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Very high vaccination coverage is required to eliminate measles, but achieving high coverage can be constrained by the logistical challenges associated with subcutaneous injection. To simplify logistics of vaccine delivery, a patch containing micron-scale polymeric needles was formulated to encapsulate the standard dose of measles vaccine (1000 TCID50) and the immunogenicity of the microneedle patch was compared with subcutaneous injection in rhesus macaques. The microneedle patch was administered without reconstitution with diluent, dissolved in skin within 10 minutes, and caused only mild, transient skin erythema. Both groups of rhesus macaques generated neutralizing antibody responses to measles that were consistent with protection and the neutralizing antibody titers were equivalent. In addition, the microneedle patches maintained an acceptable level of potency after storage at elevated temperature suggesting improved thermostability compared to standard lyophilized vaccine. In conclusion, a measles microneedle patch vaccine was immunogenic in non-human primates, and this approach offers a promising delivery method that could help increase vaccination coverage.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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