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Author Notes:

Email: andrew.b.sawers.emory.edu

AS and LHT made substantial contributions to the conception and design of the manuscript as well as it’s drafting and revising.

All authors have read and approved the final manuscript.

The authors wish to thank J. Lucas McKay, Madeleine Hackney and Charles C. Kemp for assistance in revising the manuscript, as well as Karen Liu, Tiffany L. Chen and Tapomayukh Bhattacharjee for helpful feedback.

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Grant EFRI-1137229.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Engineering, Biomedical
  • Neurosciences
  • Rehabilitation
  • Engineering
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Human-human interaction
  • Human-robot interaction
  • Haptics
  • Rehabilitation robotics
  • RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL
  • OPTIMAL FEEDBACK-CONTROL
  • SPINAL-CORD-INJURY
  • SOCIAL FACILITATION
  • MUSCLE ACTIVATION
  • OVERGROUND GAIT
  • CHRONIC STROKE
  • MOTOR-CONTROL
  • COORDINATION
  • MOVEMENT

Perspectives on human-human sensorimotor interactions for the design of rehabilitation robots

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

Volume:

Volume 11, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 142-142

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Physical interactions between patients and therapists during rehabilitation have served as motivation for the design of rehabilitation robots, yet we lack a fundamental understanding of the principles governing such human-human interactions (HHI). Here we review the literature and pose important open questions regarding sensorimotor interaction during HHI that could facilitate the design of human-robot interactions (HRI) and haptic interfaces for rehabilitation. Based on the goals of physical rehabilitation, three subcategories of sensorimotor interaction are identified: sensorimotor collaboration, sensorimotor assistance, and sensorimotor education. Prior research has focused primarily on sensorimotor collaboration and is generally limited to relatively constrained visuomotor tasks. Moreover, the mechanisms by which performance improvements are achieved during sensorimotor cooperation with haptic interaction remains unknown. We propose that the effects of role assignment, motor redundancy, and skill level in sensorimotor cooperation should be explicitly studied. Additionally, the importance of haptic interactions may be better revealed in tasks that do not require visual feedback. Finally, cooperative motor tasks that allow for motor improvement during solo performance to be examined may be particularly relevant for rehabilitation robotics. Identifying principles that guide human-human sensorimotor interactions may lead to the development of robots that can physically interact with humans in more intuitive and biologically inspired ways, thereby enhancing rehabilitation outcomes.

Copyright information:

© 2014 Sawers and Ting; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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