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Author Notes:

Correspondence should be addressed to Charles F. Gillespie; cgilles@emory.edu

The authors would like to thank Allen W. Graham, Angelo Brown, Rebecca Roffman, and the entire Grady Trauma Project and Stress and Diabetes Study Project staff for their assistance in data collection and management.

There are no conflict of interests to disclose.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was primarily supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (MH071537 for K. J. Ressler, MH102890 for A. Powers, and MH099211 for C. F. Gillespie) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD071982 for B. Bradley).

Support also included Emory and Grady Memorial Hospital General Clinical Research Center, NIH National Centers for Research Resources (M01 RR00039).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
  • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • US ADULTS
  • METAANALYSIS
  • SYMPTOMS
  • PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

Emotion Dysregulation and Inflammation in African-American Women with Type 2 Diabetes

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Journal Title:

Neural Plasticity

Volume:

Volume 2016

Publisher:

, Pages 8926840-8926840

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, has been associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotion dysregulation is a transdiagnostic risk factor for many psychological disorders associated with chronic inflammatory state. The objective of this study was to determine whether inflammation is associated with emotion dysregulation in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We examined associations between trauma exposure, MDD, PTSD, emotion dysregulation, and CRP among 40 African-American women with T2DM recruited from an urban hospital. Emotion dysregulation was measured using the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. PTSD and MDD were measured with structured clinical interviews. Child abuse and lifetime trauma load were also assessed. Analyses showed that both emotion dysregulation and current MDD were significantly associated with higher levels of CRP (p < 0.01). Current PTSD was not significantly related to CRP. In a regression model, emotion dysregulation was significantly associated with higher CRP (p < 0.001) independent of body mass index, trauma exposure, and MDD diagnosis. These findings suggest that emotion dysregulation may be an important risk factor for chronic inflammation beyond already known risk factors among women with T2DM, though a causal relationship cannot be determined from this study.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Abigail Powers et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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