About this item:

252 Views | 298 Downloads

Author Notes:

Corresponding author and reprint requests: Ravi Mangal Patel, M.D., 2015 Uppergate Dr. NE, 3rd floor, Division of Neonatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322. Tel: (404) 727-5905; Fax: (404) 727-3236; Email:rmpatel@emory.edu

The sponsors had no role in the (1) study design; (2) the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; (3) the writing of the report; and (4) the decision to submit the paper for publication.

The authors have no potential conflicts of interest, including specific financial interests and relationships and affiliations relevant to the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Dr. Patel received salary support from the National Institutes of Health under award numbers UL1TR000454 and KL2TR000455.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Pediatrics
  • OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
  • PEDIATRICS
  • BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANTS
  • RANDOMIZED-TRIAL
  • BREAST-MILK
  • UNITED-STATES
  • RISK
  • INITIATION
  • PROMOTION
  • DISCHARGE
  • DURATION
  • INCREASE

Early feeding factors associated with exclusive versus partial human milk feeding in neonates receiving intensive care

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Perinatology

Volume:

Volume 34, Number 8

Publisher:

, Pages 606-610

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objective:To evaluate early feeding factors associated with exclusive human milk (EHM) feeding at discharge in a cohort of human milk-fed infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Study Design:Retrospective cohort of consecutively discharged infants from two NICUs over a 12-month period who received any human milk during the 24 h before hospital discharge. We used logistic regression to evaluate early feeding factors associated with EHM feeding at discharge. Result:We evaluated a total of 264 infants. EHM-fed infants were twice as likely to receive human milk at the first feeding compared with partial human milk-fed infants (65% vs 32%; P<0.01). In multivariable analysis, including adjustment for race and type of maternal insurance, infants receiving human milk as the initial feeding, compared with formula, had a greater odds of EHM feeding at hospital discharge (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=3.41; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.82 to 6.39; P<0.001). Conclusion:Among infants admitted to the NICU whose mothers provide human milk, those receiving human milk as the first feeding were more likely to receive EHM feeding at discharge.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 17 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jp.2014.63.

Copyright information:

© 2014, Rights Managed by Nature Publishing Group

Export to EndNote