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Author Notes:

E-mail: Prockop@medicine.tamhsc.edu (DJP); awchan@emory.edu (AWSC)

Conceived and designed the experiments; Wrote the paper: BRS DJP AWC.

Performed the experiments; Analyzed the data; Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: BRS AMC.

hMSCs were acquired from the Center for Gene Therapy at Tulane University. We thank Andrew Robinson for his assistance with the stereological cell counting and microscope orientation and James Munoz for his mentorship and scientific advice. We also thank Shang-Hsun Yang for his assistance establishing the N171-82Q mice. All procedures were approved by YNPRC/Emory Animal Care and Biosafety Committees.

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)/National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants RR-00165 and RR018827.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS
  • STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS
  • SUBEPENDYMAL LAYER
  • RODENT BRAIN
  • ACID
  • TRANSPLANTATION
  • MICROSPHERES
  • PROGENITORS
  • EXPANSION
  • THERAPY

Human Multipotent Stromal Cells (MSCs) Increase Neurogenesis and Decrease Atrophy of the Striatum in a Transgenic Mouse Model for Huntington's Disease

Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 5, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages e9347-e9347

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Background:Implantation of human multipotent stromal cells from bone marrow (hMSCs) into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of mice was previously shown to stimulate proliferation, migration and neural differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells. We hypothesized that hMSCs would be beneficial in a mouse model of Huntington disease (HD) due to these neurogenic effects. Results:We implanted hMSCs into the striatum of transgenic mice (N171-82Q) that are a model for HD. The implanted hMSCs rapidly disappeared over 3 to 15 days. However, they increased proliferation and neural differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells for up to 30 days. They also increased neurotrophic signaling and decreased atrophy of the striatum in 3-month old HD mice implanted with hMSCs one month earlier. Conclusions:The results therefore suggested that neural implantation of hMSCs may be of benefit in HD but a number of parameters of dose, treatment schedule, and route of administration need to be optimized.

Copyright information:

© 2010 Snyder et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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