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Author Notes:

Correspondence should be addressed to Cassandra L. Quave, cassy.quave@gmail.com

A review of the literature concerning field studies of medical TK in Europe would not have been possible without the dedicated work of the numerous ethnobiologists that have contributed to the body of literature on this subject. We also wish to acknowledge the many local communities, collaborators, and study participants throughout Europe who have so generously shared their traditional knowledge with the researchers who conducted the studies reviewed here.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Integrative & Complementary Medicine
  • FOLK MEDICINAL-PLANTS
  • BIOSPHERE RESERVE CATALONIA
  • SOUTH-WESTERN SARDINIA
  • NORTHERN ALBANIAN ALPS
  • TRADITIONAL MEDICINE
  • IBERIAN PENINSULA
  • PHARMACEUTICAL ETHNOBOTANY
  • PROVINCE TURKEY
  • EAST ANATOLIA
  • PALLARS PYRENEES

Medical Ethnobotany in Europe: From Field Ethnography to a More Culturally Sensitive Evidence-Based CAM?

Tools:

Journal Title:

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Volume:

Volume 2012

Publisher:

, Pages 156846-156846

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

European folk medicine has a long and vibrant history, enriched with the various documented uses of local and imported plants and plant products that are often unique to specific cultures or environments. In this paper, we consider the medicoethnobotanical field studies conducted in Europe over the past two decades. We contend that these studies represent an important foundation for understanding local small-scale uses of CAM natural products and allow us to assess the potential for expansion of these into the global market. Moreover, we discuss how field studies of this nature can provide useful information to the allopathic medical community as they seek to reconcile existing and emerging CAM therapies with conventional biomedicine. This is of great importance not only for phytopharmacovigilance and managing risk of herb-drug interactions in mainstream patients that use CAM, but also for educating the medical community about ethnomedical systems and practices so that they can better serve growing migrant populations. Across Europe, the general status of this traditional medical knowledge is at risk due to acculturation trends and the urgency to document and conserve this knowledge is evident in the majority of the studies reviewed.

Copyright information:

© 2012 Cassandra L. Quave et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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