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Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Dr. Aasef G. Shaikh, MD, PhD, Department of Neurology, Emory University, 1841 Clifton Road, NE, Suite 350, Atlanta, GA 30329-4021, aasefshaikh@gmail.com.

The authors thank Dr. Aaron Wong and Mr. Dale Roberts for assistance.

Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report. Full financial disclosures and author roles may be found in the online version of this article.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study was supported in part by grants from Gustavus and Louise Pfeiffer Foundation, Ataxia-telangiectasia Children’s Project, NIH EY01849, and NIH NS065701

AG was supported by Dystonia Medical Research Foundation Clinical Fellowship Award.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • torticollis
  • neural integrator
  • cerebellum
  • midbrain
  • basal ganglia
  • SPASMODIC TORTICOLLIS
  • GAZE SHIFTS
  • INTERSTITIAL NUCLEUS
  • FASTIGIAL NUCLEUS
  • PROJECTIONS
  • ORIENTATION
  • CEREBELLUM
  • PHYSIOLOGY
  • DISORDERS
  • CAJAL

Oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia: Dystonia, tremor, or both?

Tools:

Journal Title:

Movement Disorders

Volume:

Volume 30, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 834-842

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis.

Copyright information:

© 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

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