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Author Notes:

Author for correspondence: A. Vezzani, Tel.: +39 02 3901 4410, Fax: +39 02 354 6277, annamaria.vezzani@marionegri.it.

The authors have no other relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript apart from those disclosed.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

A Vezzani is supported by Fondazione Monzino and EPITARGET (FP7 2007–2013, grant agreement no602102).

R Dingledine is supported by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) CounterACT program grant U01 NS05158 and NIH grants R21 NS074169 and P20 NS080185.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pharmacology & Pharmacy
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • animal models
  • anti-inflammatory treatments
  • blood-brain barrier
  • comorbidities
  • COX-2
  • cytokines
  • neurodegeneration
  • outcome
  • prognosis
  • refractory status epilepticus
  • seizures
  • REFRACTORY STATUS EPILEPTICUS
  • TEMPORAL-LOBE EPILEPSY
  • SPONTANEOUS RECURRENT SEIZURES
  • EXPERIMENTAL FEBRILE SEIZURES
  • MEDIATED STATUS EPILEPTICUS
  • PROSTAGLANDIN RECEPTOR EP2
  • MOBILITY GROUP BOX-1
  • RAT MODEL
  • BRAIN INFLAMMATION
  • RETROSPECTIVE MULTICENTER

Immunity and inflammation in status epilepticus and its sequelae: possibilities for therapeutic application

Tools:

Journal Title:

Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

Volume:

Volume 15, Number 9

Publisher:

, Pages 1081-1092

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening neurological emergency often refractory to available treatment options. It is a very heterogeneous condition in terms of clinical presentation and causes, which besides genetic, vascular and other structural causes also include CNS or severe systemic infections, sudden withdrawal from benzodiazepines or anticonvulsants and rare autoimmune etiologies. Treatment of SE is essentially based on expert opinions and antiepileptic drug treatment per se seems to have no major impact on prognosis. There is, therefore, urgent need of novel therapies that rely upon a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying this clinical condition. Accumulating evidence in animal models highlights that inflammation ensuing in the brain during SE may play a determinant role in ongoing seizures and their long-term detrimental consequences, independent of an infection or auto-immune cause; this evidence encourages reconsideration of the treatment flow in SE patients.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Informa UK, Ltd.

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