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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Patricia Wei Denning, MD, Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Dr. NE, 3rd floor, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322. Phone (404) 727-3375. Fax (404) 727-3236. Email: pllin@emory.edu

Disclosures: The authors do not have any relevant conflicts of interest.

The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, United States) under Award Numbers KL2TR000455 and UL1TR000454 (R.M.P.) and R01 HD059122 (P.W.D).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Pediatrics
  • BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANTS
  • NF-KAPPA-B
  • EMPIRICAL ANTIBIOTIC-TREATMENT
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIALS
  • INTENSIVE-CARE-UNIT
  • PREMATURE-INFANTS
  • PRETERM INFANTS
  • PREBIOTIC SUPPLEMENTATION
  • BACTERIAL-COLONIZATION
  • CLOSTRIDIUM-DIFFICILE

Intestinal microbiota and its relationship with necrotizing enterocolitis

Tools:

Journal Title:

Pediatric Research

Volume:

Volume 78, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 232-238

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in infants born prematurely. After birth, the neonatal gut must acquire a healthy complement of commensal bacteria. Disruption or delay of this critical process, leading to deficient or abnormal microbial colonization of the gut, has been implicated as key risk factor in the pathogenesis of NEC. Conversely, a beneficial complement of commensal intestinal microbiota may protect the immature gut from inflammation and injury. Interventions aimed at providing or restoring a healthy complement of commensal bacteria, such as probiotic therapy, are currently the most promising treatment to prevent NEC. Shifting the balance of intestinal microbiota from a pathogenic to protective complement of bacteria can protect the gut from inflammation and subsequent injury that leads to NEC. Herein, we review the relationship of intestinal microbiota and NEC in preterm infants.

Copyright information:

Copyright © 2015 International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc

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