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Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Jan R Mead; Email: jmead@emory.edu

No potential conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

J.R.M. is supported in part by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs (VA Merit Program, grant # BX000983) and by NIH grant #DP2 AI112242-01.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Cryptosporidium
  • vaccine
  • immunotherapy
  • HYPERIMMUNE BOVINE COLOSTRUM
  • ENZYME-IMMUNOASSAY DETECTION
  • IMMUNOSUPPRESSED ADULT MICE
  • IMMUNOGLOBULIN-G ANTIBODIES
  • RIBOSOMAL-PROTEIN P2
  • PARVUM INFECTION
  • TOXOPLASMA-GONDII
  • IMMUNE-RESPONSES
  • MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES
  • INTERFERON-GAMMA

Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium

Tools:

Journal Title:

Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

Volume:

Volume 10, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 1505-1513

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo.

Copyright information:

© 2014 Landes Bioscience

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

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