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Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Rosemary Rochford, Center for Global Health and Translational Science, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA, E-mail: rochforr@upstate.edu

The authors thank Julie Ritchie and Nancy Fiore for excellent technical assistance.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Alex's Lemonade Stand

NIH. Grant Numbers: R01CA102667, R37AI049660, R01AI084808, P01AI078907

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • malaria
  • plasmodium
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Burkitt's lymphoma
  • activation induced cytidine deaminase
  • INDUCED CYTIDINE DEAMINASE
  • C-MYC ONCOGENE
  • BURKITTS-LYMPHOMA
  • PLASMODIUM-FALCIPARUM
  • GERMINAL-CENTERS
  • IN-VIVO
  • KENYA
  • ACTIVATION
  • INFECTION
  • DNA

AID expression in peripheral blood of children living in a malaria holoendemic region is associated with changes in B cell subsets and Epstein-Barr virus

Tools:

Journal Title:

International Journal of Cancer

Volume:

Volume 136, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 1371-1380

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The development of endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) is closely associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and holoendemic malaria infections. The role of EBV in the development of malignancy has been studied in depth, but there is still little known about the mechanisms by which malaria affects Burkitt's lymphomagenesis. Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression is necessary for the introduction of c-myc translocations that are characteristic of BL, but a link between AID and EBV or malaria is unclear. To determine whether frequency of malaria exposure leads to increased AID expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) we examined two cohorts of children in western Kenya with endemic and sporadic malaria transmission dynamics. High frequency of malaria exposure led to increased expression of AID, which coincided with decreases in the IgM+ memory B cells. In the children from the malaria endemic region, the presence of a detectible EBV viral load was associated with higher AID expression compared to children with undetectable EBV, but this effect was not seen in children with sporadic exposure to malaria. This study demonstrates that intensity of malaria transmission correlates with AID expression levels in the presence of EBV suggesting that malaria and EBV infection have a synergistic effect on the development of c-myc translocations and BL.

Copyright information:

© 2014 UICC.

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