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Author Notes:

Address for correspondence Subrata Sarkar, MD, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, 8-621 Mott Hospital, 1540 East Hospital Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-4254 (e-mail: subratas@med.umich.edu).

Conflict of Interest: None.

Although NICHD staff did have input into the study design, conduct, analysis, and manuscript drafting, the comments and views of the authors do not necessarily represent the views of the NICHD.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The National Institutes of Health and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) provided grant support for the Neonatal Research Network's GDB Study through cooperative agreements.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Pediatrics
  • cystic periventricular leukomalacia
  • screening cranial imaging
  • extremely low birth weight preterm infants
  • BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANTS
  • WHITE-MATTER INJURY
  • PRETERM INFANTS
  • INTRAVENTRICULAR HEMORRHAGE
  • CEREBRAL-PALSY
  • ULTRASOUND
  • ABNORMALITIES
  • LEUCOMALACIA
  • DIAGNOSIS
  • NEONATE

Screening Cranial Imaging at Multiple Time Points Improves Cystic Periventricular Leukomalacia Detection

Tools:

Journal Title:

American Journal of Perinatology

Volume:

Volume 32, Number 10

Publisher:

, Pages 973-979

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objective The aim of this study is to determine whether the cystic periventricular leukomalacia (cPVL) detection rate differs between imaging studies performed at different time points. Design We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively collected data of 31,708 infants from the NICHD Neonatal Research Network. Inclusion criteria were infants<1,000g birth weight or<29 weeks' gestational age who had cranial imaging performed using both early criterion (cranial ultrasound [CUS]<28 days chronological age) and late criterion (CUS, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography closest to 36 weeks postmenstrual age [PMA]). We compared the frequency of cPVL diagnosed by early and late criteria. Results About 664 (5.2%) of the 12,739 infants who met inclusion criteria had cPVL using either early or late criteria; 569 using the late criterion, 250 using the early criterion, and 155 patients at both times. About 95 (14.3%) of 664 cPVL cases seen on early imaging were no longer visible on repeat screening closest to 36 weeks PMA. Such disappearance of cPVL was more common in infants<26 weeks' gestation versus infants of 26 to 28 weeks' gestation (18.5 vs. 11.5%; p=0.013). Conclusions Cranial imaging at both<28 days chronological age and closest to 36 weeks PMA improves cPVL detection, especially for more premature infants.

Copyright information:

© 2015 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc.

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