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Author Notes:

E-mail Address : gmvazqu@emory.edu

Subject:

Research Funding:

his study was funded by the project "Estudio multidisciplinario para la identificación de variables asociadas a la transmisión de enfermedades zoonóticas y enfermedades transmitidas por vector en Yucatán" of the Red epidemiológica de Enfermedades Zoonóticas y Transmitidas por Vector (ETV's) de Importancia en Salud Pública (PROMEP 2008-103.5/09/12.58. SISTPROY CIRB-2009-0006).

Keywords:

  • Peridomicile
  • Triatoma dimidiata
  • Trypanosoma cruzi
  • Chagas disease

CHICKEN COOPS, Triatoma dimidiata INFESTATION AND ITS INFECTION WITH Trypanosoma cruzi IN A RURAL VILLAGE OF YUCATAN, MEXICO

Tools:

Journal Title:

Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo

Volume:

Volume 57, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 269-272

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

This study longitudinally investigated the association between Triatoma dimidiata infestation, triatomine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi and household/backyard environmental characteristics in 101 homesteads in Molas and Yucatan, Mexico, between November 2009 (rainy season) and May 2010 (dry season). Logistic regression models tested the associations between insect infestation/infection and potential household-level risk factors. A total of 200 T. dimidiata were collected from 35.6% of the homesteads, mostly (73%) from the peridomicile. Of all the insects collected, 48% were infected with T. cruzi. Infected insects were collected in 31.6% of the homesteads (54.1% and 45.9% intra- and peridomiciliary, respectively). Approximately 30% of all triatomines collected were found in chicken coops. The presence of a chicken coop in the backyard of a homestead was significantly associated with both the odds of finding T. dimidiata (OR = 4.10, CI 95% = 1.61-10.43, p = 0.003) and the presence of triatomines infected with T. cruzi (OR = 3.37, CI 95% = 1.36-8.33, p = 0.006). The results of this study emphasize the relevance of chicken coops as a putative source of T. dimidiata populations and a potential risk for T. cruzi transmission.
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