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Author Notes:

Nancy G. Kutner; E-mail: nkutner@emory.edu

The interpretation and reporting of the data presented here are the responsibility of the authors and in no way should be seen as an official policy or interpretation of the US government.

The results presented in this paper have not been published previously in whole or part, except in abstract format. The authors declare that they have no other relevant financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study was supported by National Institutes of Health contract HHSN267200715004C, ADB No. N01-DK-7-5004 (Dr Kutner).

Keywords:

  • depression
  • falls
  • frailty
  • hemodialysis
  • USRDS

Falls among hemodialysis patients: Potential opportunities for prevention?

Tools:

Journal Title:

Clinical Kidney Journal

Volume:

Volume 7, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 257-263

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

BackgroundFalls among patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD) have significant consequences for quality of life and functional independence, morbidity, healthcare utilization and even mortality, but studies on the etiology of falls within large HD cohorts are limited.MethodsFalls during the past 12 months were ascertained for a prevalent multi-center HD cohort (n 762) aged 20-92 years, and associations with demographic and treatment characteristics, comorbidities, cognitive function, prescribed medications, balance tests, frailty and depressive symptoms were assessed.ResultsFalls were sustained by 28.4 of participants. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, participants classified as frail were over two times more likely to report falls [odds ratio (OR): 2.39, 95 confidence interval (CI): 1.22-4.71, P 0.01], and participants with a CES-D score 18 and/or prescribed antidepressants were over 80 more likely to be fallers (OR: 1.83, 95 CI: 1.23-2.74, P 0.003) than were participants with a CES-D score <18 and no prescribed antidepressants. ConclusionsFrailty and depressed mood, factors that are potentially modifiable, are prominently associated with falls. © 2014 The Author 2014.

Copyright information:

© The Author 2014

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits making multiple copies, distribution of derivative works, distribution, public display, and publicly performance, provided the original work is properly cited. This license requires credit be given to copyright holder and/or author, copyright and license notices be kept intact.

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