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Author Notes:

Adriana Galvan, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA e-mail: agalvan@emory.edu

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The authors are supported by research grants from NIH (R01-NS054976, P50-NS071669 and R01-NS071074), and by an NIH infrastructure grant to the Yerkes National Primate Research Center (P51-OD011132).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Anatomy & Morphology
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Parkinson's disease
  • parkinsonism
  • basal ganglia
  • electrophysiology
  • extracellular recording
  • LFP
  • animal models
  • DEEP BRAIN-STIMULATION
  • GLOBUS-PALLIDUS NEURONS
  • SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS NEURONS
  • PRIMARY MOTOR CORTEX
  • LOCAL-FIELD POTENTIALS
  • MPTP-INDUCED PARKINSONISM
  • NIGRA PARS RETICULATA
  • MEDIUM SPINY NEURONS
  • DOPAMINERGIC NEUROTOXIN 1-METHYL-4-PHENYL-1,2,3,6-TETRAHYDROPYRIDINE
  • UNILATERAL 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE LESIONS

Alterations in neuronal activity in basal ganglia-thalarnocortical circuits in the parkinsonian state

Tools:

Journal Title:

Frontiers in Neuroanatomy

Volume:

Volume 9, Number FEB

Publisher:

, Pages 1-21

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

In patients with Parkinson's disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials (LFPs), electroencephalograms (EEGs)or electrocorticograms (ECoGs). Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson's disease, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS)therapy.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Galvan, Devergnas and Wichmann.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits making multiple copies, distribution, public display, and publicly performance, distribution of derivative works, provided the original work is properly cited. This license requires copyright and license notices be kept intact, credit be given to copyright holder and/or author.

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