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Author Notes:

E-mail: cwongtr@emory.edu

Conceived and designed the experiments: CW KG CMH. Performed the experiments: CW KG KB. Analyzed the data: CW KG KB. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: CW KB KC AMF. Contributed to the writing of the manuscript: CW KB KC AMF CMH.

Disclaimer: The contents do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Government.

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs: BX001306 (CW) and BX001910 (CMH); National Institutes of Health: HL102167 (CMH), DK074518 (CMH), HL090342 (KC); American Thoracic Society Foundation Research Program (CW). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • MESENCHYMAL TROPHIC UNIT
  • TRACHEAL SMOOTH-MUSCLE
  • TOBACCO-SMOKE EXPOSURE
  • AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS
  • PULMONARY-FUNCTION
  • CIGARETTE-SMOKE
  • PROTEIN-KINASE
  • ASTHMA
  • ACTIVATION
  • EXPRESSION

Nicotine Stimulates Nerve Growth Factor in Lung Fibroblasts through an NF kappa B-Dependent Mechanism

Tools:

Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 9, Number 10

Publisher:

, Pages e109602-e109602

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Rationale: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is classically found in asthma, and persistent AHR is associated with poor asthma control. Although airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical pathophysiologic role in AHR, the paracrine contributions of surrounding cells such as fibroblasts to the contractile phenotype of ASM cells have not been examined fully. This study addresses the hypothesis that nicotine promotes a contractile ASM cell phenotype by stimulating fibroblasts to increase nerve growth factor (NGF) secretion into the environment.

Copyright information:

This is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Universal : Public Domain Dedication License ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/), which permits distribution, public display, and publicly performance, making multiple copies, distribution of derivative works, provided the original work is properly cited.

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