About this item:

591 Views | 0 Downloads

Author Notes:

Please direct correspondence to J.J McDowell, Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, Email: jack.mcdowell@emory.edu

We thank Meral M. Patel for her help conducting the experiments and for providing useful summaries of parts of the research literature.

Paul Soto made many helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper, for which we are grateful.

Portions of this research were presented at the 4th International Conference of the Association for Behavior Analysis in Sydney, Australia, August 2007.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This presentation was supported by a faculty travel grant to the first author from the Institute of Comparative and International Studies of Emory University.

Keywords:

  • selection by consequences
  • behavior dynamics
  • matching theory
  • computational modelling
  • concurrent schedules

A COMPUTATIONAL THEORY OF SELECTION BY CONSEQUENCES APPLIED TO CONCURRENT SCHEDULES

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Volume:

Volume 90, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 387-403

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Virtual organisms animated by a computational theory of selection by consequences responded on symmetrical and asymmetrical concurrent schedules of reinforcement. The theory instantiated Darwinian principles of selection, reproduction, and mutation such that a population of potential behaviors evolved under the selection pressure exerted by reinforcement from the environment. The virtual organisms' steady-state behavior was well described by the power function matching equation, and the parameters of the equation behaved in ways that were consistent with findings from experiments with live organisms. Together with previous research on single-alternative schedules (McDowell, 2004; McDowell & Caron, 2007) these results indicate that the equations of matching theory are emergent properties of the evolutionary dynamics of selection by consequences.

Copyright information:

© Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Inc.

Export to EndNote