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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Katharina V. Echt, Ph.D., 1670 Clairmont Rd., Mail Code 151/R, Decatur, GA 30033. (404) 321-6111, x6323; FAX: (404) 728-4837; kecht@emory.edu

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Research Funding:

Department of Veterans Affairs Career Development Award E7108M to M.E. Hackney. Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Merit Grant #O3494R to K.V. Echt and A. Spiro III, VA Career Development Award (E4591H) to K.S. Hawley, and VA Clinical Science Research and Development Merit Review and Research Career Scientist awards to A. Spiro III; Cooperative Studies Program/ERIC, Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System.

A VA Career Development Award (E7108M) supports M.E. Hackney. This research was supported by the Department of VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Merit Grant (O3494R) to K.V. Echt, and A. Spiro III, by a VA Associate Investigator Award (E4591H) to K.S. Hawley, and by a VA Clinical Science Research and Development Merit Review and Research Career Award to A. Spiro III. The VA Normative Aging Study is supported by VA Cooperative Studies Program/ERIC, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and is a research component of the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC).

Physical and cognitive function in older men: Is longitudinal study participation related to better functioning?

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Journal Title:

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

Volume:

Volume 60, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 396-398

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Longitudinal studies, the gold standard for measuring intra-individual trajectories of change over time, provide crucial information about human aging through the repeated observation of developmental trends. Knowing the extent to which cross-sectional data from a longitudinal sample relates to data from a one-time measurement sample is essential to data interpretation and application in clinical trials, treatment decisions, and health policy for older adults. However, when participants are rigorously screened at enrollment and attrition is high, longitudinal participants may become increasingly select over time, limiting the generalizability of findings. Individuals enrolled with exceptional health or who received repeated health evaluations while continuing in a study may have better physical and cognitive function than individuals who lack these characteristics and experiences.

Copyright information:

© 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society

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