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Address correspondence to: Guido Silvestri, M.D., Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University School of Medicine, 929 Gatewood Road Atlanta, GA, 30329. Phone: 1-404-727-9139; Fax: 1-404-727-7768; gsilves@emory.edu; or to Mirko Paiardini, Ph.D., Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University School of Medicine, 929 Gatewood Road Atlanta, GA, 30329. Phone: 1-404-727-9840; Fax: 1-404-727-7768; mirko.paiardini@emory.edu

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This work was supported by grant R01-AI66998 and P01-AI76074 (to G.S), R56-AI087186 (to M.P.), and P51-RR051 (to YNPRC).

Low levels of SIV infection in sooty mangabey central-memory CD4+ T-cells is associated with limited CCR5 expression

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Nature Medicine

Volume:

Volume 17, Number 7

Publisher:

, Pages 830-836

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Naturally SIV-infected sooty mangabeys (SMs) do not progress to AIDS despite high-level virus replication. We previously showed that the fraction of CD4+CCR5+ T-cells is lower in SMs compared to humans and macaques. Here we found that, after in vitro stimulation, SM CD4+ T-cells fail to up-regulate CCR5, and that this phenomenon is more pronounced in CD4+ central-memory T-cells (TCM). CD4+ T-cell activation was similarly uncoupled from CCR5 expression in SMs in vivo during (i) acute SIV infection and (ii) following antibody-mediated CD4+ T-cell depletion. Remarkably, CD4+ TCM of SMs that express low levels of CCR5 demonstrated reduced susceptibility to SIV infection both in vivo and in vitro when compared to CD4+ TCM of RMs. These data suggest that low CCR5 expression on SM CD4+ T-cells favors the preservation of CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and promotes an AIDS-free status by protecting CD4+ TCM from direct virus infection.

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© 2011 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.

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