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Author Notes:

Larry J. Young, Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, 954 Gatewood Drive, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: lyoun03@emory.edu.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by National Institute of Mental Health Grants 58824 and 56897 (L.J.Y.); and by National Science Foundation Grant IBN 9876754 (T.R.I.).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • vasopressin
  • V1a receptor
  • ventral pallidum
  • social attachment
  • affiliation
  • viral vector
  • monogamy
  • pair bond
  • ANXIETY-RELATED BEHAVIOR
  • MICROTUS-OCHROGASTER
  • PRAIRIE VOLES
  • SOCIAL-ORGANIZATION
  • SPECIES-DIFFERENCES
  • V-1A RECEPTOR
  • OXYTOCIN
  • BRAIN
  • NEURONS
  • IMMUNOREACTIVITY

Facilitation of affiliation and pair-bond formation by vasopressin receptor gene transfer into the ventral forebrain of a monogamous vole

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

Volume:

Volume 21, Number 18

Publisher:

, Pages 7392-7396

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Behaviors associated with monogamy, including pair-bond formation, are facilitated by the neuropeptide vasopressin and are prevented by a vasopressin receptor [V1a receptor (V1aR)] antagonist in the male prairie vole. The neuroanatomical distribution of V1aR dramatically differs between monogamous and nonmonogamous species. V1aR binding is denser in the ventral pallidal region of several unrelated monogamous species compared with nonmonogamous species. Because the ventral pallidum is involved in reinforcement and addiction, we hypothesize that V1aR activation in this region promotes pair-bond formation via a mechanism similar to conditioning. Using an adeno-associated viral vector to deliver the V1aR gene, we increased the density of V1aR binding in the ventral pallial region of male prairie voles. These males exhibited increased levels of both anxiety and affiliative behavior compared with control males. In addition, males overexpressing the V1aR in the ventral pallidal region, but not control males, formed strong partner preferences after an overnight cohabitation, without mating, with a female. These data demonstrate a role for ventral pallidal V1aR in affiliation and social attachment and provide a potential molecular mechanism for species differences in social organization.

Copyright information:

Copyright © 2001 Society for Neuroscience

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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