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Author Notes:

Correspondence: Marianne Celano, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 12 Executive Park Drive, NE, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA (mcelano@emory.edu)

Subject:

Research Funding:

All phases of this study were supported by a grant from the National Eye Institute (# U10 EY013287 and U10 EY13272).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics
  • INTRAOCULAR-LENS CORRECTION
  • RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL
  • AMBLYOPIA TREATMENT INDEX
  • VISUAL IMPAIRMENT
  • MONOCULAR APHAKIA
  • CONTACT-LENS
  • ASSOCIATION
  • STRESS
  • ACUITY
  • IMPACT

Behaviors of children with unilateral vision impairment in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of AAPOS

Volume:

Volume 20, Number 4

Publisher:

, Pages 320-325

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Purpose: To determine whether behavioral functioning of 4.5-year-olds differs between two treatments for unilateral cataract and whether behavioral functioning is predicted by visual acuity in the treated eye. Methods: The Infant Aphakia Treatment Study is a multicenter clinical trial in which 114 infants with unilateral congenital cataracts were randomized to undergo cataract extraction with contact lens correction or implantation of an intraocular lens. Patching data were collected during the year preceding a visit at age 4.5 years, when both visual acuity and caregiver-reported behavioral functioning were assessed for 109 participants. Caregiver stress was assessed with the Parenting Stress Index at 4.25 years. Results: There were no treatment group differences in behavioral functioning as measured by the Child Behavior Checklist. Poorer visual acuity was associated with more externalizing behavior problems (attention problems and aggressive behavior) and total behavior problems in regression models that did not include caregiver stress. Both caregiver stress and dichotomized visual acuity significantly predicted externalizing problems. Conclusions: Treatment assignment did not affect caregiver-reported behavior. Poor visual acuity may confer risk for problems with attention and aggressive behavior in preschoolers treated for unilateral cataract.(figure missing)

Copyright information:

© 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

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