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Author Notes:

Email Address :Leslie S. Kean :Leslie.kean@emory.edu

Financial disclosure: Alex Y. Huang was supported by the National Cancer Institute (grant R01 CA171523), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (grant R21A1092299), St Baldrick’s Foundation, Hyundai “Hope-on-Wheels” Program, Alex’s Lemonade Stand, Gabrielle’s Angel Foundation, Dana Foundation, and Cancer Research Institute.

Financial disclosure:Agne Petrosiute was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant K12HD057581), St Baldrick’s Foundation, and Hyundai “Hope-on-Wheels” Program. Deborah S. Barkauskas was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant T32EB7509).

Financial disclosure:W. Nicholas Haining was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants AI082630, AI057266, and AI090023).

Financial disclosure:Kenneth R. Cooke was supported by the Burroughs Welcome Fund, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and National Center for Regenerative Medicine at Case Western Reserve University.

Financial disclosure:Leslie S. Kean was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (grant 2U19 AI051731), National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (grants 1R01 HL095791 and 2U24 RR018109), and a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences.

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Research Funding:

Karnail Singh was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (grant 2U19 AI051731).

Viewing Transplantation Immunology Through Today's Lens: New Models, New Imaging, and New Insights

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Journal Title:

Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation

Volume:

Volume 19, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages S44-S51

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

The last several decades have brought significant immunologic advances in the fields of inflammation, infection, and transplantation tolerance. Heretofore, our understanding of how complex immune interactions occur has been limited to static in situ tissue analysis and in vitro dynamic studies using isolated cells devoid of stromal elements typically present in vivo. Recent advances in molecular, flow cytometry, and intravital imaging have provided new insight into the dynamic interactions occurring among a variety of cells within the bone marrow (BM) and immune systems, ranging from undifferentiated hematopoietic progenitors to fully committed effector memory cells, which will likely have direct clinical and translational implications. In this review we highlight how the application of these cutting-edge technologies will sculpt the landscape of the next generation of immunologic advances.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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